Liberty Landing Ferry Arrival

Liberty Landing Ferry arrival (World Financial Center.) Video Pablo Herrera.

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Staten Island Ferry

The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry shuttle operated by the New York City Department of Transportation. It runs 5.2 miles (8.4 km) in New York Harbor between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island. The ferry departs Manhattan from the Staten Island Ferry Whitehall Terminal at South Ferry, at the southernmost tip of Manhattan near Battery Park. On Staten Island, the ferry arrives and departs from the St. George Ferry Terminal on Richmond Terrace, near Richmond County’s Borough Hall and Supreme Court. Service is provided 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and is punctual 96% of the time. The Staten Island Ferry has been a municipal service since 1905, and currently carries over 23 million passengers annually on the 5.2-mile (8.4 km) run.[2] While trips take 25 minutes, service usually runs every 30 minutes most hours of the day and night, with more frequent service during peak times. (Wikipedia.) Video by Pablo Herrera.

East River, Manhattan from Lighthouse Park, Roosevelt Island

Roosevelt Island is a narrow island in New York City’s East River. It lies between Manhattan Island to its west and the borough of Queens on Long Island to its east, and is part of the borough of Manhattan. Running from the equivalent of East 46th to 85th Streets on Manhattan Island, it is about 2 miles (3.2 km.) The island was called Minnehanonck by the Lenape and Varkens Eylandt (Hog Island) by New Netherlanders, and during the colonial era and later as Blackwell’s Island. It was known as Welfare Island when it was used principally for hospitals, from 1921 to 1971. It was renamed Roosevelt Island in 1971 after Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt Island is owned by the city, but was leased to the state of New York’s Urban Development Corporation for 99 years in 1969. Most of the residential buildings on Roosevelt Island are rental buildings. There is also a cooperative (Rivercross) and a condominium building (Riverwalk). One rental building (Eastwood) has left New York State’s Mitchell-Lama Housing Program, though current residents are still protected. Three other buildings are now working toward privatization, including the cooperative (From Wikipedia.) Video by Pablo Herrera.

Roosevelt Island Bridge

The Roosevelt Island Bridge is a vertical lift bridge that connects Roosevelt Island in Manhattan to Astoria in Queens, crossing the East Channel of the East River. It is the sole route to the island for vehicular and foot traffic. Construction of the bridge began on March 17, 1952, at a cost of $6.5 million. It opened on May 18, 1955, as the Welfare Island Bridge. The name was changed to the Roosevelt Island Bridge in 1973. When the bridge is open it provides ships with 100 feet (30 m) of vertical clearance. It is 40 feet (12 m) wide, and its total length, including approaches, is 2,877 feet (877 m). In 2001, the New York City Department of Transportation considered converting the Roosevelt Island Bridge into a fixed bridge to reduce the cost of its maintenance. The bridge is rarely opened, because most vessels passing by Roosevelt Island use the West Channel of the East River. Most of the bridge openings occur in September during the General Assembly at the United Nations when the West Channel is closed for security reasons. Video by Pablo Herrera.

Broadway Junction, Brooklyn

Broadway Junction is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the elevated BMT Canarsie Line and BMT Jamaica Line, and the underground IND Fulton Street Line. It was also served by trains of the Fulton Street Elevated until that line closed in 1956. It is located roughly at the intersection of Broadway, Fulton Street, and Van Sinderen Avenue at the border of Bedford-Stuyvesant and East New York, Brooklyn. What is now Broadway Junction sits atop the historical Jamaica Pass, the junction of the modern Broadway, Fulton Street, and Jamaica Avenue. The first rail service in the area was the Long Island Rail Road’s Atlantic Branch at East New York station, which started construction in 1836 and was complete by at least 1843. The Brooklyn and Rockaway Beach Railroad (the predecessor to the BMT Canarsie Line) began service in the area in 1865. The name Manhattan Junction or Manhattan Beach Junction was applied to the station on what is now the Jamaica Line when it opened in 1885. A station on the Fulton Street Elevated at Sackman Street opened on July 4, 1889, when the line was extended to Atlantic Avenue. The entire complex was renovated in the late 1990s.For a long time, the stations within the complex went by three different names: Eastern Parkway (later Broadway – Eastern Parkway) (BMT Jamaica Line), Broadway Junction (BMT Canarsie Line), and Broadway – East New York (IND Fulton Street Line). Conformity between the station names was established in the early 2000s. Video by Pablo Herrera (2017.)