Jackson Heights, The Heart of Latin America in New York

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Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. The Jackson Heights name comes from Jackson Avenue, the former name for Northern Boulevard, a major thoroughfare that bisects the neighborhood. Based on data from the 2010 United States Census, the population of Jackson Heights was 108,152. The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 57% Hispanic or Latino, 17% White, 2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 22% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander and 0.5% other races. This series of photographs was taken by Pablo Herrera in the environs of Roosevelt Avenue in April 2017.

Woodside, Queens

Woodside is a working and middle-class residential and commercial neighborhood in the western portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. It is bordered on the south by Maspeth, on the north by Astoria, on the west by Sunnyside, and on the east by Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. Some areas are widely residential and very quiet, while other parts, especially the ones around Roosevelt Avenue, are more urban. In the 19th century the area was part of the Town of Newtown (now Elmhurst). However, with large-scale residential development in the 1860s, Woodside became the largest Irish American community in Queens, being approximately 80% Irish by the 1930s and maintaining a strong Irish culture today. In the early 1990s, many Asian American families moved into the area, with the population being 30% Asian American. South Asians and Latinos have also moved to Woodside in recent years. Reflecting its longtime diverse foods and drink, the neighborhood is filled with many cultural restaurants and pubs. It is also home to some of the city’s most popular Thai, Filipino, and South American eateries. Video by Pablo Herrera (2017.)

Williamsburg Has Undergone Gentrification Characterized by Hipster Culture

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Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint to the north; Bedford–Stuyvesant to the south; Bushwick, East Williamsburg, and Ridgewood, Queens to the east; and Fort Greene and the East River to the west.  As of the 2010 United States Census, the neighborhood had a population of 32,926, an increase of 2.0% from the 32,269 enumerated in 2000. Since the late 1990s, Williamsburg has undergone gentrification characterized by hipster culture, a contemporary art scene, and vibrant nightlife. During the early 2000s, the neighborhood became a center for indie rock and electroclash, and has been nicknamed “Little Berlin”. Numerous ethnic groups inhabit enclaves within the neighborhood, including Italians, Jews, Hispanics, Poles, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans. Photo Series by Pablo Herrera (2013.)

Kensington, Brooklyn

Kensington is a neighborhood in the center of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is the area south of Prospect Park and the Green-Wood Cemetery. It is bordered by Coney Island Avenue to the east, Fort Hamilton Parkway and Caton Avenue to the north, McDonald Avenue to the west, and 18th Avenue to the south.  Kensington is a predominantly residential area that consists of housing types that run the gamut from brick rowhouses to detached one-family Victorians to apartment buildings. Pre-war brick apartment buildings dominate the Ocean Parkway and Coney Island Avenue frontage, including many that operate as co-ops.  Kensington is a very diverse neighborhood, containing African-American, Ukrainian, South Asian (Bangladeshi and Pakistani), Chinese, Orthodox Jewish, Hasidic, Irish, Polish, Italian, Albanian, Russian, Latino, Mexican, Australian and Caribbean communities. More than 300 immigrants from Darfur have also settled in Kensington as of 2010. Video by Pablo Herrera, 2017.

Manhattan Skyline (East River)

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City. The waterway, which is actually not a river despite its name, connects Upper New York Bay on its south end to Long Island Sound on its north end. It separates the borough of Queens on Long Island from the Bronx on the North American mainland, and also divides Manhattan from Queens and Brooklyn, which is also on Long Island. Because of its connection to Long Island Sound, it was once also known as the Sound River. The tidal strait changes its direction of flow frequently, and is subject to strong fluctuations in its current, which are accentuated by its narrowness and variety of depths. The waterway is navigable for its entire length of 16 miles (26 km), and was historically the center of maritime activities in the city, although that is no longer the case.

Coney Island, Brooklyn, February 2011

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This series of 8 pictures was taken by Pablo Herrera on February 2011.Coney Island is a peninsular residential neighborhood, beach, and leisure/entertainment destination on the Coney Island Channel, which is part of the Lower Bay in the southwestern part of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. The site was formerly an outer barrier island but became partially connected to the rest of Long Island by land fill. The residential portion of the peninsula is a community of 60,000 people in its western part, with Sea Gate to its west, Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach to its east, the Lower Bay to the south, and Gravesend to the north.

Manhattan, February 2011

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This series of 12 pictures was taken by Pablo Herrera on February 2011. Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and the city’s historical birthplace. The borough is coextensive with New York County, founded on November 1, 1683, as one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the East, Hudson, and Harlem rivers, and also includes several small adjacent islands and Marble Hill, a small neighborhood on the U.S. mainland.