Jackson Heights, The Heart of Latin America in New York

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Jackson Heights is a neighborhood in the northwestern portion of the borough of Queens in New York City. The Jackson Heights name comes from Jackson Avenue, the former name for Northern Boulevard, a major thoroughfare that bisects the neighborhood. Based on data from the 2010 United States Census, the population of Jackson Heights was 108,152. The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 57% Hispanic or Latino, 17% White, 2% African American, 0.1% Native American, 22% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander and 0.5% other races. This series of photographs was taken by Pablo Herrera in the environs of Roosevelt Avenue in April 2017.

Williamsburg Has Undergone Gentrification Characterized by Hipster Culture

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Williamsburg is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn, bordering Greenpoint to the north; Bedford–Stuyvesant to the south; Bushwick, East Williamsburg, and Ridgewood, Queens to the east; and Fort Greene and the East River to the west.  As of the 2010 United States Census, the neighborhood had a population of 32,926, an increase of 2.0% from the 32,269 enumerated in 2000. Since the late 1990s, Williamsburg has undergone gentrification characterized by hipster culture, a contemporary art scene, and vibrant nightlife. During the early 2000s, the neighborhood became a center for indie rock and electroclash, and has been nicknamed “Little Berlin”. Numerous ethnic groups inhabit enclaves within the neighborhood, including Italians, Jews, Hispanics, Poles, Puerto Ricans, and Dominicans. Photo Series by Pablo Herrera (2013.)

Coney Island, Brooklyn, February 2011

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This series of 8 pictures was taken by Pablo Herrera on February 2011.Coney Island is a peninsular residential neighborhood, beach, and leisure/entertainment destination on the Coney Island Channel, which is part of the Lower Bay in the southwestern part of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City. The site was formerly an outer barrier island but became partially connected to the rest of Long Island by land fill. The residential portion of the peninsula is a community of 60,000 people in its western part, with Sea Gate to its west, Brighton Beach and Manhattan Beach to its east, the Lower Bay to the south, and Gravesend to the north.

Manhattan, February 2011

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This series of 12 pictures was taken by Pablo Herrera on February 2011. Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and the city’s historical birthplace. The borough is coextensive with New York County, founded on November 1, 1683, as one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. The borough consists mostly of Manhattan Island, bounded by the East, Hudson, and Harlem rivers, and also includes several small adjacent islands and Marble Hill, a small neighborhood on the U.S. mainland.

Harlem in 11 Pictures

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Harlem is a neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Since the 1920s, Harlem has been known as a major African-American residential, cultural and business center. Originally a Dutch village, formally organized in 1658, it is named after the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands. Harlem’s history has been defined by a series of economic boom-and-bust cycles, with significant population shifts accompanying each cycle. Photo credit Pablo Herrera.